Dialogue

This entry is to report that I have found the document that I lost entitled Dialogue. It was lost in my files and I did not know what to search for. There is much editing needed but I have decided to post it as installments. Originally it was to be Student/Teacher. I reconsidered this approach. My final decision was to simply list myself as S and the art and art history student as E, the first letter of our names. There is discussion about many topics, not all specifically Anthropsophical and not always about art. I thought the contrasting esoteric perspectives might be of interest. It can be accessed above or here by clicking: Dialogue.

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Alkaline Glaze

Alkaline Glaze

A traditional alkaline glaze is made from limestone and or ashes (which contains alkaline salts including calcium), clay, and sand or crushed glass. Clay is an Alumina silicate, Al2O3 2SiO2 2H2O.  The green color comes from iron in an oxygen starved, or reduction atmosphere during the firing process. I thought it might be interesting to look at an example of this in the context of a quote from Steiner from his Agricultural lectures:

“Lime is Generalized Outer desire. Silica is Generalized outer Perception. Clay mediates between them. Clay is closer to silica but mediates towards lime.”

Seven Arts Parabola

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When French eurythmist, Gabrielle Armenier recently visited UTRGV she gave a presentation to 2 of my classes and  helped generate discussion. Our particular task during her visit was to discus and demonstrate the relationship between sculpture and eurythmy. In my 3D Design class she drew the above diagram on our classroom blackboard. Durring this discussion, the question was generated: “What is Social Art?” Using this diagram helped, if not ultimately clarify , give a starting point for understanding the art of the future.

Festiba UTRGV Visiting Artist: GABRIELLE ARMENIER.

 

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French eurythmist Gabrielle Armenier trained in ballet and modern dance before undertaking the four-year full-time eurythmy training in Spring Valley, NY. She holds a Bachelor in Eurythmy Pedagogy from the Den Norske Eurythmihoyskole, Oslo (2013) and a Masters in Eurythmy Pedagogy from the Freie Hochschule Stuttgart (2014).

Events surrounding the visiting Artist: GABRIELLE ARMENIER:

She visited the Edinberg UTRGV campus Tuesday, Feruary 27, 2017, 12:30 at the art building on Closner Rd.

February 28 – March 2 2017 she visited the Brownsville UTRGV campus

March 2, 2017, 7:30, Thursday night at the TSC Arts Center in Brownsville TX, Stephen Hawks joined visiting artist, Gabrielle Armenier on stage , discussing the relationship between Eurythmy and sculpture.

Architecture Steiner

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“Every building deprives a portion of the earth of sun, wind and rain and probably plant and animal life as well. It must redeem this sacrifice by the healing quality of its architecture.”

-Rudolf Steiner

I was looking for new projects for my 3D Design class and came across this site: https://artandanthroposophy.wordpress.com/2017/01/14/httparchitecturesteiner-com I liked the quote from their home page so I reproduced it above.

 

Wharton Esherick

There are sometimes long periods between my posts. This time it has been unusually long. However, as I have returned to Brownsville and  visiting the libraries here and preparing for classes, I came across a very good book:
Wharton Esherick: The Journey of a Creative Mind
By Mansfield Bascom
Publisher Harry N. Abrams, 2010
ISBN 0810995751, 9780810995758
Length 276 pages

I have been moderately aware of Wharton Esherick’s work and have come across it on several occasions. Without reading or knowing much about his work, other than an article I clipped and saved years ago, I thought to myself how he had some stylistic characteristics in his work that reminded me of other artists influenced by Rudolf Steiner and the impulses coming from Anthroposophical art. This could be said of many 20th century artists that only ever encountered these indirectly. I was not sure which was true about Esherick. Recently I found his biography, written upon request by his son-in-law, Mansfield Bascom, in The UTRGV library in Brownsville. 6 pages in the Book briefly reference Steiner in several places indicating that he had been influenced by Steiner. Apparently from the writing it was a direct influence not so much from Steiner’s verbal teachings, but from the artistic expressions, Eurythmy, the architectural and sculptural forms, and specifically the Group sculpture.

Here is yet another 20th artist, a modernist, and an American, that can be linked to the influences of Anthroposophy, with some obvious innate affinity, even if it is not an affinity with Steiner’s occult teachings. In a way, this is paradoxical, because art is often the most occult of teachers or teachings. I have noticed this is often the case and it goes along with what Steiner has said on occasion. One does not make converts by forcing ideas on those who have already long been on a distinctive path of their own. Athroposophy from the beginnings has mingled with other paths. The Bauhaus is a prime example where Anthroposophy has an influence but is not the only influence at work. It is important to remember that Steiner stated it matters most that art express the spirit and that specific style was less important.

Wharton Esherick Museum

Considering Joseph Beuys

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How to Explain Pictures to a Dead Hare

My interest in the work of Joseph Beuys runs parallel to my introduction to many of the people active in the American Arts section of the Anthroposophical Society in America, early in this century. While attending grad school, I made Beuys the topic of one of my art history term papers. I sent the paper to someone in the arts section and was understandably rebuked for not having researched properly,  among other things. I had not had access to or time to read what had been written about Beuys from within the Anthroposophical movement except minimally.  It was also inferred that my own artistic endeavors involving the manifestation of Anthroposophy was more important than my weak critical analysis. This too was right, which I tried to do, in my small way, in the thesis work I produced at the time.

Never the less, I think it might be of interest to some, especially those unfamiliar with the esoteric roots of Beuys work. It may serve as a basic introduction, pointing out, but with limited esoteric content.

For any that might question my closing assessment of Beuys work in this paper and to avoid misunderstanding in general, It is not meant as a condemnation but as an empathetic gesture; I owe Beuys a lot; If the artistic path is not a path to freedom, then what is it?

Here is the link:

Esoteric Foundations of Joseph Beuys’ Art in the Teachings of Rudolf Steiner

Note: The above file is compiled from scanned pages, due to my poor typing skills and for the sake of expediency.  Consequently, paradoxically and unfortunately, I was unable to edit out the typos and the grading marks.